I’ve spent 5 years writing a JavaScript framework on my own.

Jelmer on 2017-03-20

Typescene is a robust front end library written in TypeScript: strongly typed, no dependencies, no nonsense. It’s really great for desktop-like (or mobile) applications, not so great for blogs and other content. It isn’t backed by some major corporation, not even a startup, but it’s been built by me: one developer on a mission to build a no-nonsense dependency-less framework — not scared of rework and refactoring because not much was at stake all this time except my own dog food work, until now.

Go check out https://typescene.dev and take it for a spin.

But why?

Photo by Luca Bravo on Unsplash

With so many great platforms and tools that are available for Web development today, it’s easier than ever to build rich Internet apps using one of the existing frameworks. But all of this progress in Web development comes at a cost. Have you ever opened a years-old project that used the favorite Web framework-du-jour, and tried to make sense of it now? Would you be able to maintain such a piece of software?

All of this progress comes at a cost. Have you ever opened a years-old project that used the favorite Web framework-du-jour, and tried to make sense of it now?

Sure enough, modern package managers solve some of the compatibility issues, but library APIs are constantly in flux. New ideas come in and ‘legacy’ ones disappear. Who will remember the (hypothetical) peculiarities of the willUpdate method in version 14.2.132 of framework X?

If constantly upgrading to the latest version is not an option, we’re setting ourselves up for trouble down the road.

Maintainability

This might not be an issue for one-offs and personal projects that you’re constantly working on, but maintainability is a major concern for any software that needs to be supported by a business or other organization in the long term.

Most code isn’t updated constantly (like Facebook or Dropbox), or written once and then forgotten, but rather something in between.

Here’s where the design goals of the Typescene framework come in.

Goals

Taken from the Introduction page on the Typescene website:

Most importantly, Typescene hasn’t been invented overnight, it’s not a Minimum Viable Product that introduces some clever new paradigm. It’s the result of years of practical experimentation, refactoring, and validation — built to last, and ready to support modern applications in the real world.

Learn more about the Typescene architecture, or check out the other docs.

Follow typescene on Twitter.